COVID-19: Who Need to Take Extra Precautions?

People at Higher Risk for Severe Illness-Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more severe complications from COVID-19.

Other Populations-Information for other populations like pregnant people, people experiencing homelessness, and people with disabilities.

COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based on what we know now, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 are:

-People 65 years and older
-People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
-People of all ages with underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, including:

*People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
*People who have serious heart conditions
*People who are immunocompromised

Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications

-People with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 40 or higher)
-People with diabetes
-People with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis
-People with liver disease

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Reduce Your Risk of Getting Sick

There are things you can do to reduce your risk of getting sick.

-Stay home if possible.
-Wash your hands often.
-Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others (stay 6 feet away, which is about two arm lengths).

Senior Living Facilities

People with loved ones in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and other types of senior living facilities may be understandably concerned about their loved one’s risk of illness from COVID-19.

To protect these vulnerable friends and family members, CDC has advised that long-term care facilities

-restrict visitors,
-regularly check healthcare workers and residents for fevers and symptoms, and
-limit activities within the facility to keep residents safe.

8 out of 10 deaths reported in the U.S. have been in adults 65 years old and older.

Among adults with confirmed COVID-19 reported in the U.S.:

Estimated percent requiring hospitalization

*31-70% of adults 85 years old and older
*31-59% of adults 65-84 years old

Estimated percent requiring admission to intensive care unit

*6-29% of adults 85 years old and older
*11-31% of adults 65-84 years old

Estimated percent who died

*10-27% of adults 85 years old and older
*4-11% of adults 65-84 years old

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